1. How to Pitch a Story to an Editor in the Media

    Mandy Stadtmiller tells you what’s up.

  2. Yaaaaaaaassssss it’s pitchbitch day! Work on a pitch, discuss a pitch, research a pitch, email a pitch TODAY! Tell us about it using the #pitchbitch hashtag. Godspeed ye female writers!

  3. So You Want to Pitch a Food Article? What to Do (and Avoid) | Serious Eats

    More pitching advice, this time from Serious Eats!

  4. How To Pitch Personal Essays To BuzzFeed Ideas

    In plain-ass English, how to pitch BuzzFeed Ideas.

  5. Pitches that worked: Guantanamo Bay research story for DISCOVER Magazine

    Julie Schwietert Collazo shares a successful pitch for DISCOVER Magazine.

  6. We spoke to Francesca Ohlert, deputy editor of newish literary journal The Suburban Review. Their next issue, the Stellar Edition, is going to include only work by women, in celebration of The Stella Prize. The team created a Pozible campaign to fund it that I was going to spruik except that it’s already reached its target! Niiiiiiice. Here’s Francesca.

    Tell me a bit about yourself and The Suburban Review.

    The Suburban Review is a Melbourne-based literary journal that’s blossomed over the past year and a half, driven by a team of hardworking volunteers who want to support and celebrate Australian writers and artists. We’re committed to paying all of our contributors and producing beautiful print and web collections. You can find us online at thesuburbanreview.com or stocked in independent bookstores around Melbourne. Me, I’m usually the deputy editor, but for the upcoming Stellar Edition I’ve slunk my way up to guest Editor-In-Chief! When I’m not doing things for the journal I study Literature and Creative Writing at Melbourne Uni and work in a little bookstore — my life has accidentally/not-so-accidentally come to revolve around words.

    2. You’re looking for submissions from emerging female writers — why is that?

    That’s right! Our fourth issue is a nod to the Stella Prize, an award that celebrates the work of Australian female writers. We’re publishing an all-female issue for two reasons. The first being that, even though females have dominated my university creative writing courses, there is still a discrepancy in the visibility of male and female writers in Australia. Especially when you think of the cannon of ‘great Australian voices’. Secondly, and beyond any political agenda, we want to celebrate female narratives, because they are so richly diverse and rewarding for us to collect…and share!

    3. What are you looking for? What are you not looking for?

    We’re probably looking for you, dear reader! Submissions for our Stellar issue have just closed. But we’re always hunting for next issues’ stars. As a journal team we’re open-minded; we publish a huge spectrum of work. I’d like to think that here at The Suburban Review we’re casting a net into the pool of Australian talent and pulling up treasures, many of which we never anticipated to find. Me personally, I look for works of love where you can see that the author has taken time are care with both their writing style and their subject matter. Pieces that come across as spiteful, half-hearted or half-finished make me cranky.

    4. Are you a writer yourself? Can you tell us about your own approach to pitches?

    I write often for university and have had several other publications. I’m hopelessly insecure about my finished pieces, so there’s an irony in my talking to Pitch, Bitch! (I’m a classic case of being willing to hear the, ever lurking, negative critiques of my work and hesitant to take any positive reviews seriously). It’s a condition I see in many — often other female — writers. I haven’t found a cure yet, I look to sources like yours to help me out. In terms of actually pitching, I make an event in my calendar when I want to pitch/submit something. An alarm will go off a few days before I’d promised myself I’d send work, then another angry alarm will go off around 3pm on D-day. By making a pitch a concrete event or an obligation I’ve found I’m more likely to just do it. So, to all those tentative submitters out there, I salute you, and use my other hand to point you in the direction of The Suburban Review.

  7. Yea verily it is the day to get your pitch on. Work on, research, or send a pitch and tell us all about it using the #pitchbitch hashtag! seriously, friends.

  8. How to write a news editorial, opinion piece or op-ed

    Eternal goddess Amy Gray has posted at Pesky Feminist about how to write an opinion piece. (Remember her amazing pitching advice for us?)

  9. Could you tell us a bit about yourself?

    Not as easy as it might appear! I do lots of different things. I am the founding editor and publisher of Belt Magazine (beltmag.com). I teach at Oberlin College. I am writing a book on handwriting (Bloomsbury 2015) and I freelance.

    As an editor, what kinds of ideas immediately speak to you, and what do you respond well to in pitches?

    As an editor, a story I haven’t heard before with a good angle. Getting the right angle is key. “there’s a new development in Buffalo” doesn’t do much for me, but “what does this new development say about Buffalo’s corrupt politics?” will catch my eye (I’m making up that corrupt part—sorry Buffalo pols!). As for pitches themselves: it’s amazing how many people forget to tell me about themselves in their pitches. That last paragraph where you sum up your bio? It’s very important!

    Have you noticed a gender difference in who pitches you that reflects the VIDA statistics, which showed more men were being published than women?

    YES. I get very few pitches from women—and most pitch the essay section not the feature or commentary one. I am a very outspoken advocate for women writers, and I blasted social media and said “the site will go dark unless women pitch!” a few months ago. The posts were very widely shared and everyone was like “Yes!” but very few women actually sent pitches. We had a small uptick, and now, back to the dudes. Also, I hired a new (male) editorial director and after he introduced himself in our weekly newsletter, we got several pitches from well-known male writers immediately after—-these men already knew about Belt and knew me, but had never reached out before. It was amazing to watch.

    As a writer, what was your most intimidating/scary pitch, or the pitch you were most invested in? How did it work out?

    A pitch is just an email! One that, if you are sending to a new-to-you publication or editor, may never even be read. I don’t stress out over a pitch—I write them quickly and then send. No luck? I revise to make it better and send somewhere else. Now turning in a story? That can be scary. Not pitching though. Just. Hit. Send.

    Tell us about your courses at The Thinking Writer.

    I started The Thinking Writer to help women learn the ins and outs of pitching—it seems that transparency aids women particularly, as it can be hard for us to ask questions to better understand a process. If someone lays out the terms and rules, it’s easier to join the game. I also made the courses welcoming for academics seeking to reach general audiences, because I made that transition myself. The courses are online, last 2 weeks, and contain tons of helpful information—sample queries, editor back and forths, a large database of markets, and a growing number of editor Q&As. Classes are limited to 12 people and aim to create a community. And afterwards, all “alums” have access to a private FB group where we ask questions, share our latest clips, exchange leads, etc. Lots of people have received their first or “biggest” sale *during* our courses, and lots of friendships have been forged. It’s super fun.

  10. sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
 Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”
 
 


Always.

    sorayachemaly:

    10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

    These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

    • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
    • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
    • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
    • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
    • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
    • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
    • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
    • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
    • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

    The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

    This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

    Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

    In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

     Really, practice those ten words

    “Stop interrupting me.” 

    “I just said that.”

    “No explanation needed.”

     

     

    Always.

    Reblogged from: fourteenery
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